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training budget

e-learning on a budget

E-learning on a budget – five tips on how to do it

E-learning

In today’s economy, L&D budgets are under more scrutiny than ever before and even though there is consensus about the importance of training your employees the jury is still out on what is a reasonable sum to invest in people who tend to change numerous jobs. Luckily, it’s not hard to make e-learning on a budget. Here are some tips about how to go about it.

Calculating the ROI of training

Why it’s important to calculate the ROI of training in order to ensure the L&D budget

Managers

It can be challenging to calculate the ROI of training but it is not impossible. Specific numbers can be obtained fairly easily, but if you are looking for numbers that are indeed impressive and will guarantee a generous learning budget, you’ll need to make sure that the goals of the training units are in line with the objectives of the company. This way, everybody is guaranteed substantial gain.

online training is cost-effective

3 Reasons why online training is cost-effective

E-learning, Managers

Providing relevant learning opportunities and professional development for employees is certainly a significant investment from the part of companies. Couple this with a foggy ROI, and you can’t really blame managers for searching for options and consider all the ways to cut training costs. Opting for delivering online training is a cost-effective way of investing in employees while optimizing budgets.

maximizing your training budget

Maximizing your training budget: instructor-led training, e-learning, or both?

E-learning, Instructional Designers

When it comes to creating training courses most clients tend to believe it is either one or the other, and if they do choose both they assume two independent development streams and budgets. But if we consider the amount of cost and effort to create both instructor-led courses and e-learning ones, the best option for maximizing the training budget is to go for both these possibilities.

Empowering employees with mobile learning

Empowering employees with mobile learning

E-learning

The key to happy, loyal employees is empowerment and the key to that is equipping them with the necessary tools and knowledge while at the same time allowing them to access it when, where and how they see fit. Mobile learning shifts the focus from the content to the learner, allowing for a personal, flexible, non-invasive learning experience.

LMS migration

LMS migration in 5 easy steps [Infographic]

E-learning, Instructional Designers, Managers

Sooner or later all business that use a learning management system to train their employees and to support their professional development will need to migrate to a new and improved system. As with all complex processes — and keeping in mind Murphy’s laws — a million of things can go wrong during an LMS migration. Check out the following 5 steps you should follow for a successful LMS migration.

Velfies and bite-sized learning

Velfies and bite-sized learning: a recipe for training success

E-learning, Instructional Designers

Velfies and bite-sized learning: bite-sized learning is cheap, offers just-in-time support, can be accessed on mobile devices, and keeps employees engaged during the learning process; videos are the most engaging type of learning materials. What happens when you combine bite-sized learning, videos, and the familiarity and comfort of selfies? The answer is training velfies.

Too busy for learning

Too busy for learning? That’s just an excuse!

Instructional Designers, Learners

The paradigm surrounding workplace training is that while everyone agrees upon its importance, almost nobody puts it on their high priority list. Managers know that their company’s competitiveness is directly related to employees’ skills development, yet L&D departments are often the first to be hit by budget cuts. Employees are perfectly aware that developing their skills directly contributes to their professional development, yet they always have something urgent to do and simply don’t show up at training sessions.

How can instructional designers destroy this “too busy” attitude towards learning?

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