Tag

learning brain

learning and sleep

Learning and sleep or why you should let your employees nap

Learners

Learning is universal and though businesses can’t really control how much sleep their employees get and how high the quality of that sleep is, raising awareness about the issue can’t hurt. Moreover, allowing workers to take short naps while on the job, especially after they have been involved in a learning experience, can do a lot of good. So what do you say: will you allow your learning employees to sleep on it?

immersive learning environments

Immersive learning environments may become the norm in training

E-learning, Instructional Designers, Managers

Immersive learning environments mix the worlds of leisure and work or informal and formal learning and have the potential to function as a professional learning treat, making learning fun. As the available immersive technology improves, and high speed Internet is everywhere at a very small cost, immersive learning environments should begin to play more of a role as a supplement to or major component of professional learning.

The learning brain

The learning brain and why L&D professionals should care about it

Instructional Designers

Besides the subject matter knowledge and technical skills, a training course creator also need to put on the hat of a neuroscientist when designing. So if you at least be clear about the benefits of going through a certain course, put some thought into how you deliver new information, allow trainees to sleep on new concepts and master spaced repetition, you’ll meet some of the needs of the learning brain.

adult learning

3 Brain science insights about adult learning

Learners

Even though every adult is different and the brains act differently during the learning process, there are some things that all adult learners have in common. If you’re in any sort involved in designing courses for adults, you might want to tune in, as I’m about to go into three brain science insights that are true to all learners.

Games in training

Games in training are no game play

E-learning, Instructional Designers, Managers

The use of games for business training purposes is still a technique that is met with a certain dose of skepticism. The fun and entertaining nature of games goes against the serious attitude of business. Add to this a faulty implementation of gaming principles and mechanics in a training program, and no wonder there are plenty of managers who consider gamification a joke. But gamification can lead to impressive outcomes, and the main reason for this is that it drives engagement.

Velfies and bite-sized learning

Velfies and bite-sized learning: a recipe for training success

E-learning, Instructional Designers

Velfies and bite-sized learning: bite-sized learning is cheap, offers just-in-time support, can be accessed on mobile devices, and keeps employees engaged during the learning process; videos are the most engaging type of learning materials. What happens when you combine bite-sized learning, videos, and the familiarity and comfort of selfies? The answer is training velfies.

Making sense of the senses in e-learning courses-2

Making sense of the senses in e-learning courses (Part 1)

E-learning, Instructional Designers

When it comes to sensorial learning, traditional face-to-face courses have the upper hand over online courses. Instructors can tap on all five senses when teaching in a physical setting. However, it’s not impossible to make online learners “feel” the course.

This first part will deal only with sight, as it’s the most important sense in learning and deserves a blog entry on it’s own.

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